Breaking fast time


Salam,

I can say overall this analysis is very good. Main contributor is brother Joe. The Quran was not revealed to Bangla/Bengali so I cannot say it is my shortcomings here.  I am ready to accept the Quranic truth always wherever it leads to me.

Dr. Md. Anisur Rahman

— On Tue, 8/16/11, J.S < > wrote:
Date: Tuesday, August 16, 2011, 3:57 PM

Salam brotehr Anisur,

This a very good point brother. The word ‘ghurub’ (setting) signifies that the sun is ‘still’ in the process of setting so it wouldn’t make sense to use this word.

I believe God said ‘layl’ because ‘layl’ is an all-encompassing time-range which starts from dusk and continues all the way to dawn. The word ‘maghrib’ is just simply a specific portion of the night… Personally, if God said ‘fast until maghrib’ there would be many folks who would misinterpret this and believe that we can only eat at ‘maghrib’ and not the rest of the night.

Once again, very good point brother.

Salam
Joe

 

“He is the One and only GOD. The Absolute GOD. Never did He beget nor was He begotten, and none equals Him.”[Quran 112]

…Peace and God Bless you…

J.S.

 

From: Md Anisur Rahman < >
Sent: Tuesday, August 16, 2011 8:25 AM
Subject: Re: The night from sunset to darkness /

[The Quran 18:86]  When he reached the far west, he found the sun setting in a vast ocean, and found people there. We said, “O Zul-Qarnain, you can rule as you wish; either punish, or be kind to them.”

I think God doesn’t say we can break our fast at magrib reason is that in which verse we can see the word magrib where magrib means we can still see the Sun is setting. That means we can still see feeble but direct Sun light what Zul-Qarnain was seeing. But so far I know nobody breaks fast at that point. Muslims break fast only when sun completely set and nobody there can see the Sun, even at setting stage.

After Sun’s complete setting still there is indirect sunlight on the sky [not becomes full dark] but brother Joe says it is now part of night. Based on his below two points I think he is correct. So at this point, I agree with brother Joe’s whole argument as to when we can break our fast. Thanks very much. Salam.

Dr. Md. Anisur Rahman

— On Tue, 8/16/11, Student of the Quran <irtaza1@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: J.S < >
Subject: Re: The night from sunset to darkness / comment on Dr. Anisur Rahman (2)

Date: Tuesday, August 16, 2011, 12:51 AM

Salam Irtaza,

The word ‘NASLAKHU’ basically means to ‘strip something off’ in a continuous manner… It is removing something gradually or continuously. The Arabs use this word when they skin an animal because they remove the skin gradually in one piece.

This same word is used in 9:5:

9:5 Once the Sacred Months are INSALAKHA….

 

The word INSALAKHA in 9:5 shows that the four Sacred Months come in a row because INSALAKHA means that the four months came continously or one after another…

Similarly, in 36:37 we see that the sign of the night is by the INSALAKHA (gradual removal, or stripping) of light… The following translators came close to translating the word correctly:

 

Pickthal
A token unto them is night. We strip it of the day, and lo! they are in darkness.

 

Shakir
And a sign to them is the night: We draw forth from it the day, then lo! they are in the dark;

 

Sher Ali
And a Sign for them is the night from which WE strip off the day, and lo ! they are left in darkness.

Also, another important point to address is that the start of a new lunar day begins at sunset and not at darkness of night.

Salam

Joe

“He is the One and only GOD. The Absolute GOD. Never did He beget nor was He begotten, and none equals Him.”[Quran 112]

…Peace and God Bless you…

J.S.

 

From: Student of the Quran < >

Sent: Monday, August 15, 2011 4:26 PM
Subject: The night from sunset to darkness / comment on Dr. Anisur Rahman (2)

Salaam Joe.

Thank you very much for this long explanation.  By the way, does NASLAKHU mean ‘gradual removal’ or “removal”?

I will be surprise!   Please reconfirm.  None of the translators mentions gradual removal.

Thank you and God bless you for all the helps.

Muhammed Irtaza

 [33:62] God’s Sunnah is unchangeable 

[39:23] The Quran is the best Hadith

http://www.islamawakened.com/Quran/ 

— On Mon, 8/15/11, J.S < > wrote:

Subject: Re: Re: The night from sunset to darkness / comment on Dr. Anisur Rahman (2)
Date: Monday, August 15, 2011, 11:01 AM

Salam Irtaza,
In traditional Islam, the layl begins at sunset while nahar begins at dawn.
The progressive Muslims see that layl is the complete absence of light while nahar is the presence of any light.
Other schools of thought believe layl is whenever the sun is below the horizon.

 

So far, I see that layl DEFINITELY begins at sunset, but I am unsure about when nahar begins yet.

Here are my observations which prove that layl begins at sunset:

 

-35:13 He merges  (TULEJ) the night into the day, and merges (TULEJ) the day into the night…

 

In 35:13  the word TULEJ means ‘to enter’…. So at sunset, the darkness of night begins to overtake the daylight and this is called layl.

-[36:37]  Another sign for them is the night: we  gradually remove (NASLAKHU) the daylight therefrom, whereupon they are in darkness.
36:38 The sun runs to a specific destination, such is the design of the Noble, the Knowledgeable

36:37 is often misunderstood because people overlook the crucial keyword NASLAKHU which means ‘gradual removal’.

With the word NASLAKHU in mind, 36:37 teaches us that the sign of the night begins when the gradual removal of light happens… This gradual removal of light happens at sunset!! and this is why the verse ends with the words ‘…whereupon they are in darkness’… In other words, layl is when the light begins to gradually remove from the sky until complete darkness happens. Additionally, it is no coincidence that in the next verse (36:38) God is speaking of the sun running its course demonstrating its relation to signaling the layl.-17:78 You shall hold the contact prayer at the declining of the sun, until the GHASAQ AL LAYL (darkness of the night); and the Quran at dawn, the Quran at dawn has been witnessed
In 17:78 we see that God is speaking of the declining of the sun (at noon) until GHASAQ AL-LAYL.

The word GHASAQ means ‘darkness’… The word LAYL means ‘night’… So God is saying ‘darkness of night’..

The words GHASAQ AL-LAYL proves that ‘layl’ alone does not mean complete darkness. If we said that ‘layl’ means complete darkness, then God wouldn’t need to say ‘darkness of night’ as this would be a redundant phrase.

Instead, the words GHASAQ AL-LAYL (darkness of night) shows that there are some parts of the night which have some light and that the GHASAQ (darkness) begins at sunset.

-11:114 You shall hold the contact prayer at both ends of the day and the near parts of the night. Dawn and dusk is when both the daylight and nighsky are mixed together. According to 11:114, God calls these times as ‘both ends of the day and the near parts of the night’…  This shows that dawn and dusk are the near parts of the night… So they are part of the night and not day. This is what I have so far… Inshallah more to come. Salam Joe
“He is the One and only GOD. The Absolute GOD. Never did He beget nor was He begotten, and none equals Him.”[Quran 112]

…Peace and God Bless you…

J.S.

From: Student of the Quran < >
Sent: Saturday, August 13, 2011 2:24 PM
Subject: Fw: Re: The night from sunset to darkness / comment on Dr. Anisur Rahman (2)

Salaam Joe,

 

Could you do some research on sunset, evening and night in the light of the Quran and find

the difference and relationship between them?

Appreciate your help,

Muhammed Irtaza

 [33:62] God’s Sunnah is unchangeable 

[39:23] The Quran is the best Hadith

http://www.islamawakened.com/Quran/ 

— On Sat, 8/13/11, J.S < > wrote:

Subject: Re: The night from sunset to darkness / comment on Dr. Anisur Rahman (2)
Date: Saturday, August 13, 2011, 2:01 PM

Just to further add to your point brother, There is a very good reason why God didn’t say ‘fast from NAHAR UNTIL LAYL’ or ‘fast from DAWN UNTIL MAGHRIB’. God told us to fast ‘at dawn’ because this is the time period where the light begins to roll into the day… We are then to fast until the Layl… God chose the word Layl – which begins at sunset – because Layl is an all-encompassing time-range. It is in my opinion that if God said ‘fast until maghrib’ this would leave a vague message because ‘magrhib’ lasts only a couple hours and it does not encompass the entire night-time like ‘layl’ does. Salam Joe

“He is the One and only GOD. The Absolute GOD. Never did He beget nor was He begotten, and none equals Him.”[Quran 112]

…Peace and God Bless you…

J.S.

 

— On Wed, 8/10/11, Md Anisur Rahman < > wrote:

Salam,

The author in this article [Why Do Muslims Break Fast Too Early!] presented that one needs to break fasting after becoming complete dark. In the holy Quran, the word magrib[18.86] is also mentioned but Allah doesn’t say we can break fast at magrib. The author [I don’t know his name] argues, beginning of night is the onset of complete dark by citing the Quran’s verse [36.37].

I am still seriously considering and wondering his points. Anyway, Quran alone followers have no other source besides the holy Quran [that’s why they are genuine Muslims] as religious guidance, so I think this type of disagreement is OK after careful analysis from each sides.

Dr. Md. Anisur Rahman

 


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